Three Christmas Songs You Didn’t Know Were Problematic

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018


We can see our breath again and neighbors are raking the final leaves of the season into bags. Thanksgiving is finished, which means finals are coming around and it is the perfect time to whole up in a library, drink coffee until the caffeine gives you heart palpitations, study, and problematize what we once saw as innocent and beloved childhood treasures.

Don’t be mistaken. The quaint and endearing atmosphere of this season hides the small flecks of white supremacy gently falling all around us in the form of patriarchal, sexist, ageist, misogynistic, racist, ableist, and xenophobic Christmas songs.

After the Huffington Post woke me up to the injustices and marginalization perpetrated by Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, I began to see just how many dearly beloved Christmas traditions I could problematize and post about on Facebook. Here are three that you didn’t know make you a bad person for enjoying.

 

  • Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer

Mocking the elderly and belittling the oppression of women, this song is ageist and sexist from the first verse on. Regarding ageism, it shames the old first for needing medication and then again for not taking it. Meanwhile the government doesn’t guarantee it as a human right.

The song continues to describes in vivid detail the abuse of an elderly woman with footprints and claus marks. It is a symbolization of the systemic destruction of women’s bodies, nothing short of an act of violence that threatens any who listen to it, but the song is meant to be humorous. Let us refrain from retweeting anything about it.

  • Frosty the Snowman

Frosty is a man and that man is white. In the song, the lyrics praise a construct built by the cultural norms of majority-culture-children playing in snow. This snowman, who believes himself to be white, then strolls into town and is immediately endeared to all who look upon him. This is sheer white supremacy, flaunting its power and appeal in small town America, and we can end it with #EndFrosty.

  • Do You Hear What I Hear?

Some people don’t hear what you hear, Noel Regney. I don’t care if he was a World War II veteran fighting Nazis or if he wrote this song seeking peace amidst the Cuban Missile Crisis; This song is ableist towards the deaf.

 

It is a good thing that we are around to wake people up on social media. Anything can be problematized. Sure, it won’t remove anything from the radio and this blog post may only reach a few hundred eyes, but it makes people feel guilty and at least we can know now that we’re better than those people.

With injustices like these, we cannot waste our time studying to be future productive members of society, making a genuine sacrifice of our time to volunteer at shelters or in school to enact change, or put down our phones to engage meaningfully with those around us. We must resist and that resistance begins with problematizing the minutiae of cultural artifacts, Facebook filters, and Twitter boycotts.

 

Photo Credit

Alum of the University Wisconsin - Madison, Daniel studied English and Spanish as an undergraduate, later to receive a masters in education. He works as a teacher in a diverse school and hopes to show how conservatism presents a viable solution to the disparity and impoverishment that the left decries.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Daniel Buck

Alum of the University Wisconsin - Madison, Daniel studied English and Spanish as an undergraduate, later to receive a masters in education. He works as a teacher in a diverse school and hopes to show how conservatism presents a viable solution to the disparity and impoverishment that the left decries.

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