Is Affirmative Action is Affirmatively Bad?

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Thursday, January 10, 2019


The United States was founded on a set of ideals that offered its citizens life, liberty, and the ability to pursue happiness.  However, the meaning of the American Dream becomes tainted when certain groups of people are given advantages in areas of employment and education based on their skin color.  

According to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, “The purpose of affirmative action is to establish fair access to employment opportunities to create a workforce that is an accurate reflection of the demographics of the qualified available workforce in the relevant job market.” However, racial diversity does not equal good diversity necessarily; the more desirable, overlooked form of diversity includes diversity of thought.

As a community college student in San Jose, California, I find myself surrounded by a lot of natural diversity. In fact, according to The City of San Jose, the demographics show that Latino people make up 32.8% of the population, and Asians make up 34.2%.  As a woman who grew up in a town in Connecticut where 97.5% of the population was white, moving to San Jose, California was a culture shock.

This diversity was exciting for me, but an important quote for me is one stated by Ben Shapiro at his speech at Yale University, “Racial diversity doesn’t mean anything. Decency means something. Diversity isn’t a bad thing, but it isn’t a good thing unless the people who are racially diverse are decent. It’s not a difficult thing; diversity isn’t our strength. Decency is our strength.”  

An article written in the New York Times, says that, “At Cornell, a black or Hispanic student from a family with a $19,000 annual income would receive $1,760 more in grant aid than a typical non-minority student from a family of similar income.” Racially diverse students do have an advantage in scholarships.

Fortunately, in 1996, public universities in California were no longer allowed to consider race, creed, sex, or color in their decisions to admit students into their schools. While this move is beneficial in terms of equality within the selection of qualified potential students, the most important part of the college process was still being overlooked: financial assistance. As costs for college rise and scholarships become an increasing necessity, balancing assistance towards one race disadvantages the opposite racism.

It isn’t just white people who are suffering from this racial epidemic.  A 2004 Princeton study found that elite universities often hold Asian Americans to a higher standard than other races. Coming from an Asian background was comparable to a loss of 50 SAT points.

Whether it is in terms of scholarships, admission, or job opportunities, Affirmative Action treats no one fairly. Judging an individual by the color of their skin and not their personal qualities is exactly what this nation fought so hard to eliminate.  As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

Lillian is currently attending community college in California and will be transferring to a University of California with an A.A in political science. Other than politics, Lillian enjoys watching SpongeBob, laughing, and having fun.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Lillian Grabowski

University of California

Lillian is currently attending community college in California and will be transferring to a University of California with an A.A in political science. Other than politics, Lillian enjoys watching SpongeBob, laughing, and having fun.

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